The Ring of Steel (2010-2013)

There’s an image from photographer Paul Strand of Wall Street (1915) that has always been unconsciously on the back of my mind while shooting these images. In the photograph we see a group of tiny silhouettes walking towards the same direction dominated by a brutal architecture, giving the impression that the group of people is submitted to the power of the building. To my understanding, the picture, featuring powerful aesthetics, is about the power of the financial industry and how everyone is under its mercy.

I was fascinated by the exotism of the City of London, the powerful financial centre and old medieval heart of the city: In its entangled network of streets and passages we can find remainders of a Roman and medieval past alongside new skycrapers and charming alleys that turn into cul-de-sac corporate yards, guarded by private security chasing photographers or anyone with an undefined path.

An army of city workers cross every morning London Bridge to make the financial machinery work. And that is where this journey starts. The city folks look confident and efficient, but if we look closer sometimes they look disturbed and fragile. The architecture is somehow designed to look bright and clean on corporate images: as if the finished building looked like the computer generated anticipation of it. The sunlight reflected on the abundant glass illuminates the street scenes and creates a very particular lighting. Almost every corner of the City is caught on CCTV, although they are missing the important.


The Ring of Steel (2010-2013)

There’s an image from photographer Paul Strand of Wall Street (1915) that has always been unconsciously on the back of my mind while shooting these images. In the photograph we see a group of tiny silhouettes walking towards the same direction dominated by a brutal architecture, giving the impression that the group of people is submitted to the power of the building. To my understanding, the picture, featuring powerful aesthetics, is about the power of the financial industry and how everyone is under its mercy.

I was fascinated by the exotism of the City of London, the powerful financial centre and old medieval heart of the city: In its entangled network of streets and passages we can find remainders of a Roman and medieval past alongside new skycrapers and charming alleys that turn into cul-de-sac corporate yards, guarded by private security chasing photographers or anyone with an undefined path.

An army of city workers cross every morning London Bridge to make the financial machinery work. And that is where this journey starts. The city folks look confident and efficient, but if we look closer sometimes they look disturbed and fragile. The architecture is somehow designed to look bright and clean on corporate images: as if the finished building looked like the computer generated anticipation of it. The sunlight reflected on the abundant glass illuminates the street scenes and creates a very particular lighting. Almost every corner of the City is caught on CCTV, although they are missing the important.

I photographed the City following the most classic street photography procedure: short lenses, look withhout being seen -the metropolitan life essence- oblique light corners with suite and tie silhouettes.

The Ring of Steel (2010-2013)

There’s an image from photographer Paul Strand of Wall Street (1915) that has always been unconsciously on the back of my mind while shooting these images. In the photograph we see a group of tiny silhouettes walking towards the same direction dominated by a brutal architecture, giving the impression that the group of people is submitted to the power of the building. To my understanding, the picture, featuring powerful aesthetics, is about the power of the financial industry and how everyone is under its mercy.

I was fascinated by the exotism of the City of London, the powerful financial centre and old medieval heart of the city: In its entangled network of streets and passages we can find remainders of a Roman and medieval past alongside new skycrapers and charming alleys that turn into cul-de-sac corporate yards, guarded by private security chasing photographers or anyone with an undefined path.

An army of city workers cross every morning London Bridge to make the financial machinery work. And that is where this journey starts. The city folks look confident and efficient, but if we look closer sometimes they look disturbed and fragile. The architecture is somehow designed to look bright and clean on corporate images: as if the finished building looked like the computer generated anticipation of it. The sunlight reflected on the abundant glass illuminates the street scenes and creates a very particular lighting. Almost every corner of the City is caught on CCTV, although they are missing the important.

I photographed the City following the most classic street photography procedure: short lenses, look withhout being seen -the metropolitan life essence- oblique light corners with suite and tie silhouettes.

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More Projects

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CommutersLondon 2013-2014

The A10 (Kingsland Road)for the Hackney Council, London

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Lamb LaneLondon 2009-2010

ARNAU ORIOL     PHOTOGRAPHER & VIDEOGRAPHER          arnauoriolsanchez@gmail.com          +34 693036392         Instagram

ARNAU ORIOL 

arnauoriolsanchez@gmail.com     +34 693036392